The Three Types of Distracted Driving - Accident & Injury Attorneys | The Law Offices of Ron Sholes, P.A.

The Three Types of Distracted Driving

The 100 days between Memorial Day and Labor Day are known as the deadliest time for teen drivers. During this summer period, traffic fatality rates for teens spike an average of 15% compared to the rest of the year. This trend is due in part to teens having more unstructured free time and opportunities to drive with other inexperienced teen passengers.

As a parent, knowing the risks of the “100 deadliest days of summer” is critical to keeping your teen driver safe. Establishing clear rules, monitoring driving habits, and limiting nighttime driving and the number of teen passengers can help reduce your teen’s risk of a deadly crash during this high-risk season. Staying informed and taking action can save lives.

Common Negligence During the 100 Deadliest Days On the Road

Summer is a time for enjoyment and adventure, but it unfortunately brings an increase of risks on the road. Personal injury lawyers have seen too many cases of preventable accidents that have resulted in devastating consequences. Luckily, there are steps you can take to protect yourself while enjoying the summer season.

Common causes of negligence during this time include:

  • Teen drivers paying more attention to friends in the car than the road, easily distracted by phones and social interactions. Studies show teens have slower reaction times, are more prone to risk-taking behavior, and have less experience judging dangerous situations.
  • Parents not properly supervising their teen’s driving or limiting the number of teen passengers in the car, which can lead to disastrous consequences.
  • Reckless driving behaviors like speeding, tailgating, and running red lights increase with more vehicles on the road, especially with impatient drivers trying to make up time.

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